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  Most popular articles (Since May 07, 2014)

 
 
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CASE REPORTS
Tooth supported overdenture: A concept overshadowed but not yet forgotten!
Rupandeep Kaur Samra, Shreenivas Vasant Bhide, Chhavi Goyal, Taranjit Kaur
January-June 2015, 7(1):16-21
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.160172  
The concept of conventional tooth-retained overdentures is a simple and cost effective treatment than the implant overdentures. When few firm teeth are present in an otherwise compromised dentition, they can be retained and used as abutments for overdenture fabrication. This helps improve the retention and stability of the final prosthesis significantly. Bone is a dynamic tissue. The extraction of teeth results in the initiation of the bone resorption pattern. However, when tensile stress is received by bone, additional bone formation takes place. Such stresses occur when occlusal forces are transmitted to the alveolar bone by the periodontal ligament. This principle helps preserve bone. The concept of overdentures may not be the elixir, but it is a positive means for delaying the process of complete endentulism and helps in the preservation of bone. To top it all, it gives the patient the satisfaction of having prosthesis with his natural teeth still present. In this article, case reports with three different types of Overdentures are discussed: Overdenture with cast copings with short dowels, O-ring attachments, and a customized bar supported overdenture with copings.
  33,065 3,102 1
REVIEW ARTICLES
Natural ways to prevent and treat oral cancer
Shweta Danaraddi, Anila Koneru, Santosh Hunasgi, Surekha Ramalu, M Vanishree
January-June 2014, 6(1):34-39
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.140213  
Oral cancer is one of the usual causes of mortality all over the world, with a five-year survival rate of only 50%. Oral cancers are treated primarily by surgery with / without adjuvant radiotherapy and / or chemotherapy. However, there is significant post-treatment morbidity and mortality secondary to recurrences. Dietary supplements like fruits and vegetables are rich in phytochemicals and provide a variety of antioxidants like vitamin A, C, E. Spirulina, Selenium, Green tea (EGCG), Neem, Tomatoes (lycopene), Turmeric (curcumin), and some medicinal mushrooms are also used as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. This overview emphasizes on natural therapies to fight against oral cancer. Thus, there are several natural compounds that can enhance the prevention of oral cancer.
  32,248 1,165 3
Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in dentistry: A review of literature
Chirag Macwan, Anshula Deshpande
July-December 2014, 6(2):71-74
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.152914  
Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a unique material with several exciting clinical applications. MTA has potential and one of the most versatile materials of this century in the field of dentistry. During endodontic treatment of primary and permanent tooth MTA can be used in many ways. MTA materials have been shown to have a biocompatible nature and have excellent potential in endodontic use. MTA materials provide better microleakage protection than traditional endodontic repair materials using dye, fluid filtration, and bacterial penetration leakage models. In both animal and human studies, MTA materials have been shown to have excellent potential as pulp-capping and pulpotomy medicaments. MTA material can be used as apical and furcation restorative materials as well as medicaments for apexogenesis and apexification treatments. In present article, we review the current dental literature on MTA, discussing composition, physical, chemical and biological properties and clinical characteristics of MTA.
  28,617 4,427 -
Nonsurgical periodontal therapy: A review
Jyotsana Tanwar, Shital A Hungund, Kiran Dodani
January-June 2016, 8(1):39-44
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.182490  
Nonsurgical therapy aims to eliminate both living bacteria in the microbial biofilm and calcified biofilm microorganisms from the tooth surface and adjacent soft tissues. Complete elimination of such pathogenic microorganisms is perhaps over-ambitious. However, a reduction in inflammation of the periodontium due to a lesser bacterial load leads to beneficial clinical changes. In addition, nonsurgical therapy aims to create an environment in which the host can more effectively prevent pathogenic microbial recolonization using personal oral hygiene methods. The concept of critical probing depth was consistently found to be greater for the surgical approach than for the nonsurgical treatment. The various methods used in nonsurgical therapy, such as hand instrumentation, ultrasonic and sonic scalers, and ablative laser therapy.
  6,203 1,323 1
CASE REPORTS
Effective management of mandibular Grade III furcation: A dicey issue
Rekha Rani Koduganti, Sarada Jandhyala, N Sandeep, P Veerendra Nath Reddy
January-June 2014, 6(1):21-25
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.140203  
The changing perspectives in dentistry aim at retaining functionally active teeth with an adequate amount of healthy supporting tissues. One such treatment opportunity available is for the management of teeth with furcation involvement, which in earlier times was attributed with a guarded prognosis. Treatment of teeth with these lesions is an uphill task for the clinician and maintenance after treatment also poses a problem to the patient due to anatomical variations, which favor the growth of micro-organisms. Teeth with furcation involvement can be maintained in a state of function for a longer period of time if appropriately treated, and if the patient is motivated adequately. Bicuspidization is a procedure, which in a properly selected case can facilitate retention of the tooth in a functional state.
  6,888 604 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
A prospective case-control study to assess and compare the role of disclosing agent in improving the patient compliance in plaque control
Mayuri Bhikaji Nepale, Siddhartha Varma, Girish Suragimath, Keshava Abbayya, Sameer Zope, Vishwajeet Kale
July-December 2014, 6(2):45-48
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.152907  
Introduction: Dental caries and periodontal diseases are multifactorial oral health problems that have dental bacterial plaque as their main etiological agent. Dental plaque removal plays an important role in oral health maintenance, which could be achieved by either mechanical or chemical plaque control. Disclosing agents in dentistry are being used to identify bacterial plaque for instruction, evaluation and research purposes. Hence, the current study is aimed at evaluating the effect of at home use of disclosing agent in improving the quality of daily oral hygiene. Materials and Methods: The present randomized, prospective case-control study was conducted among 100 subjects who were selected from the outpatient department of periodontology and divided into two groups. Group A (n = 50) is the case group who were instructed to use a disclosing agent and Group B (n = 50) is the control group who were not instructed to use a disclosing agent. Plaque status of the subjects was assessed using "Turesky-Gilmore-Glickman Modification of the Quigley Hein Plaque Index" at baseline. Both the groups were trained to perform the similar brushing technique along with same oral hygiene instructions. After 21 days, both groups were recalled, and their plaque status was re-assessed by the same method. The pre and postplaque scores of both the groups were evaluated by unpaired t-test and value of P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Preevaluation plaque score of Group A was 2.02 ± 0.24 and postevaluation score was 1.08 ± 0.26. Similarly in Group B, the preevaluation plaque score was 1.80 ± 0.92 and postevaluation score was 1.62 ± 0.48. The difference in the plaque scores was statistically significant with a P = 0.00001. Conclusion: The result shows that usage of plaque disclosing agent improves the quality of daily oral hygiene measures performed at home.
  4,653 2,795 3
CASE REPORTS
Calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst of the mandible
Nigel R Figueiredo, Manoj Meena, Ajit D Dinkar, Manisha Khorate
July-December 2014, 6(2):57-60
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.152909  
The calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst (CEOC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst, which was first categorized as a distinct entity by Gorlin in 1962. It is an unusual and unique lesion, which may show characteristics of both a solid neoplasm and a cyst. It usually occurs as an intra-osseous lesion but may occasionally occur as an extra-osseous or peripheral variant. It shows a nearly equal distribution between the maxilla and mandible and is commonly seen anterior to the first molar. The clinical and radiographic features of this lesion are not pathognomonic, and it is characterized by its histological diversity, with the most characteristic feature being the presence of a variable number of ghost cells within the epithelial component. Treatment is conservative with surgical enucleation, and recurrences are rare. This report describes a case of CEOC in association with an impacted mandibular first premolar, which was diagnosed in a 13-year-old female patient, along with a review of the literature.
  5,388 453 -
A sectional impression tray technique for an oral submucous fibrosis patient with limited mouth opening
Sowmya Mangalore Kumar, Prasad D Krishna, Rushad Hosi Nariman
July-December 2014, 6(2):65-67
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.152912  
Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a precancerous condition. It causes difficulty in swallowing, chewing and speaking due to the presence of microstomia. Limited mouth opening is considered as a hindrance in prosthodontic rehabilitation of a patient. Special impression procedures and techniques should be considered for making an impression in such cases. This article describes the fabrication of a split impression tray to make a secondary impression of an edentulous patient having OSMF.
  5,071 677 1
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Role of female reproductive hormones estrogen and progesterone in temporomandibular disorder in female patients
Santosh R Patil, Nidhi Yadav, Mohammed Assayed Mousa, Abdalwhab Alzwiri, Mohamed Kassab, Rohit Sahu, Satish Chuggani
July-December 2015, 7(2):41-43
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.172492  
Aim: The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of female reproductive hormones estrogen and progesterone in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in female patients. Materials and Methods: Serum estrogen and progesterone levels of 200 female participants who had varying grades of TMD were measured by enzyme immunoassay competition method in the luteal phase of menstrual cycle. Results: Mean serum concentration of estrogen was 302.1 ± 3.16 pg/mL, and the mean serum concentration of progesterone was 1.68 ± 38.3 ng/mL. Mean serum levels of estrogen and progesterone increased with increasing severity of TMD. Conclusion: Increased serum levels of estrogen and progesterone with increased grade of severity of TMD suggest role of these hormones as etiological factors for TMD.
  2,729 2,988 1
CASE REPORTS
Gingival mask: A case report on enhancing smiles
Aashritha Shenava
July-December 2014, 6(2):68-70
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.152913  
Periodontal attachment loss in the maxillary anterior region can often lead to esthetic and functional clinical problems including disproportional and elongated clinical crowns and visible interdental embrasures. Gingival replacement prosthesis has historically been used to replace lost tissue. A gingival mask is an easily constructed and practical device to optimize the esthetic and functional outcome in these special situations while permitting cleansibility of the prosthesis and supporting tissues. This is a case report of a young female patient treated using silicon gingival veneer with a 2-year follow-up. The silicon gingival mask has enabled the patient to regain her lost smile and face people with newly found confidence also enhancing the esthetic appearance. Virtually, no problem was encountered during the 2 years of usage of the veneer and the patient continues to use it comfortably.
  4,951 452 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Analysis of smoking habits in patients with varying grades of smoker's palate in South Western region of Maharashtra
Mrunali Dubal, Ajay Nayak, Ashwinirani Suragimath, Abhijeet Sande, Suresh Kandagal
January-June 2015, 7(1):12-15
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.160171  
Background: Tobacco is a known carcinogenic substance and a significant risk factor for the development of various oral mucosal lesions. Objective: To evaluate the smoking habits in patients with varying grades of smoker's palate depending on type of smoking, duration, and its frequency of use. Material and methods: Total 50 individuals above 20 years of age with smoking habits were included in study. The duration, frequency of smoking habits (cigratte/beedi) and palatal lesions were noted. The lesions were then classified in to different grades of smokers palate. The data was tabulated and statistically analysed. Results: The present study conducted in South Western region of Maharashtra reveals that in smokers, the type of smoking practiced is mostly cigarette than beedi, the grades increase with increase in duration and frequency too increases with grades. Conclusion: In our study, cigarette smoking was more commonly practiced than beedi. The grades of smoker's palate progress with longer duration of smoking habit and higher frequency. Early detection and screening of smokers are very important to stop the progression of initial mucosal changes to potentially malignant disorders.
  4,939 443 -
REVIEW ARTICLES
Odontogenic ghost cells: Realities behind the shadow….
Thippeswamy Shamenahalli Halappa, Jiji George, Abhilasha Shukla
January-June 2014, 6(1):40-43
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.140214  
Ghost cells are pale anucleate cells with homogeneous pale eosinophilic cytoplasm with very pale to clear central areas in place of a basophilic nucleus; which are seen in small clusters or large masses. Few odontogenic and nonodontogenic tumors exhibit the presence of these transparent or shadow cells as a typical feature. Many attempts have been made in the past by several investigators regarding the true characteristics of ghost cells in these lesions, in spite of which they seem to be mysterious. Here, we have made an attempt to clear the illusions and controversies surrounding ghost cells.
  4,456 680 -
CASE REPORTS
Single-stage surgical procedure for increasing depth of vestibule and the width of attached gingiva
Mohammad Arif Khan, Amitandra Kumar Tripathi, Rajeev Kumar Jaishwal, Poonam Agrawal
July-December 2015, 7(2):58-61
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.172496  
Shallow vestibule along with the inadequate width of attached gingiva is a common cause of the gingival recession. Multiple techniques have been developed, separately, to increase the depth of vestibule and the width of attached gingival but this case report present a single stage surgical procedure for increasing both depth of vestibule and the width of attached gingiva by vestibular deepening procedure.
  4,610 525 -
REVIEW ARTICLES
Therapeutic effects of amla in medicine and dentistry: A review
Harpreet Singh Grover, Himanshu Deswal, Yogender Singh, Amit Bhardwaj
July-December 2015, 7(2):65-68
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.172498  
Emblica officinalis (Amla) is widely used in the Indian system of medicine and believed to increase defense against diseases. Amla is called amalaki in Sanskrit. It is one of the oldest oriental medicines mentioned in Ayurveda as potential remedy for assorted ailments. A wide range of phytochemical components present in amla including alkaloids, tannins, and flavonoids have been shown to procure useful biological activities. It is an ingredient of many Ayurvedic medicines and tonics as it removes excessive salivation and internal body heat. Research has been done with amla evaluating its role as an antioxidant. Amla is useful in ulcer prevention, for diabetic patients, and for memory effects. Amla Tonic has a hematinic and lipalytic function useful in scurvy, prevents indigestion, and controls acidity as well as it is a natural source of anti-aging.
  4,633 342 -
CASE REPORTS
Deadliest tumor of oral cavity: A rare case of intra oral malignant melanoma
Nunsavathu Purnachandrarao Naik, Alaparthi Ravi Kiran, Yalamanchili Samata, Ambaldhage Vijay Kumar
July-December 2014, 6(2):49-52
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.152908  
Malignant melanoma is a rare tumor arising from the uncontrolled growth of melanocytes found in the basal layer of the epithelium. Although cutaneous malignant melanoma is the third most common malignancy of the skin, it accounts only for 3-5% of all dermal malignancies. Primary malignant melanoma of the oral mucosa is extremely rare, accounting for only 0.2-8% of all malignant melanomas. The incidence is slightly higher in males while others report a higher incidence in females. In the oral cavity, 80% of the cases occur in the maxilla with the prevalence of the hard palate or combined with the gingival or alveolar ridge. In this paper, we present a rare case of a 47-year-old female patient who reported with completely asymptomatic, pigmented growth in the maxillary anterior region.
  3,900 847 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Sealing ability of a new calcium silicate based material as a dentin substitute in class II sandwich restorations: An in vitro study
Raji Viola Solomon, Parupalli Karunakar, Deepthi Sarvani Grandhala, Chaitanya Byragoni
January-June 2014, 6(1):1-8
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.140193  
Background: Class ll sandwich restorations are routinely performed where conventional Glass ionomer cement (GIC) or Resin-modified GIC (RMGIC) is used as a base or dentin substitute and a light curing composite resin restorative material is used as an enamel substitute. Various authors have evaluated the microleakage of composite resin restorations where glass ionomer cement has been used as a base in class II sandwich restorations, but a literature survey reveals limited studies on the microleakage analysis of similar restorations with biodentine as a dentin substitute, as an alternative to glass ionomer cement. The aim of this study is:
  1. To evaluate the marginal sealing efficacy of a new calcium-silicate-based material (Biodentine) as a dentin substitute, at the cervical margins, in posterior class II sandwich restorations.
  2. To compare and evaluate the microleakage at the biodentine/composite interface with the microleakage at the resin-modified GIC/composite interface, in posterior class II open sandwich restorations.
  3. To compare the efficacy between a water-based etch and rinse adhesive (Scotch bond multipurpose) and an acetone-based etch and rinse adhesive (Prime and bond NT), when bonding biodentine to the composite.
  4. To evaluate the enamel, dentin, and interfacial microleakage at the composite and biodentine/RMGIC interfaces.
Materials and Methods: Fifty class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 25 extracted human maxillary third molars, which were randomly divided into five groups of ten cavities each: (G1) Biodentine group, (G2) Fuji II LC GIC group, (G3) Biodentine as a base + prime and bond NT + Tetric N-Ceram composite, (G4) Biodentine + scotchbond multi-purpose + Tetric N-Ceram composite, (G5) Fuji II LC as a base + prime and bond NT+ Tetric-N Ceram composite. The samples were then subjected to thermocycling, 2500× (5°C to 55°C), followed by the dye penetration test. Scores are given from 0 to 3 based on the depth of penetration of the dye at the cervical, dentin, and interfacial surfaces. The data was analyzed with the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U test. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between the five groups in the enamel, dentin, and interfacial regions. Conclusion: Within the limits of this in vitro study, biodentine is a new calcium-silicate-based material, which can be used as a dentin substitute in class II open-sandwich restorations, where its scores better than resin-modified GIC.
  4,078 636 1
REVIEW ARTICLES
Preventing postoperative swelling after periodontal surgery
Jaisika Rajpal, Aakash Arora, Ruchika Prasad, Madhav Mukund Gupta
January-June 2015, 7(1):31-34
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.160193  
Postoperative swelling following different surgical strategies is an area of great interest. The main part of the literature on the topic deals with swelling after periodontal surgery. In this review, we take into account different surgical strategies used including various flaps, no traumatic osteotomy, and primary or secondary closure. The use of pharmacological therapy and application of an ice pack is critical in the postoperative period and has always provided positive results. However, even if it is difficult to come to definite conclusions, due to the variability of the design of studies analyzed, the postoperative discomfort identified with edema, pain and trismus following wisdom tooth removal is influenced by various factors such as the difficulty of the surgical procedure involved, age and gender of the patient, and experience of the surgeon. The pharmacological therapy when performed with corticosteroids seems to improve control of the postoperative swelling related to this kind of surgeries.
  4,160 535 -
Applications of ozone therapy in dentistry
Shiva Gupta, D Deepa
July-December 2016, 8(2):86-91
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.192243  
Ozone is an allotropic form of oxygen, which is effectively used in the treatment of different diseases for more than 100 years. In the present era of increasing antibiotic resistance, ozone therapy is an alternative medical treatment that rationales to increase the amount of oxygen to the body through institution of ozone into the body. Owing to its beneficial biological properties including antimicrobial and immune-stimulating effects, ozone therapy has opened new vistas in treatment modalities of dental pathologies for patients of all ages. The objective of this article is to review the literature available on applications of ozone in dentistry.
  3,788 524 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
The effect of implant and abutment diameter on peri-implant bone stress: A three-dimensional finite element analysis
Helen Mary Abraham, Jacob Mathew Philip, Ashish R Jain, CJ Venkatakrishnan
July-December 2016, 8(2):49-52
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.192136  
Introduction: Load transfer mechanisms from the implant to surrounding bone and failure of osseointegrated implants are affected by implant geometry and mechanical properties of the site of placement as well as crestal bone resorption. Estimation of such effects allows for a correct design of implant geometry to minimize crestal bone loss and implant failure. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of implant and abutment diameter on stress distribution in the peri-implant area. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional finite element models created to replicate completely osseointegrated endosseous titanium implants and were used for the purpose of stress analysis. Two study groups that consisting of a regular platform (RP) group and narrow platform (NP) group were used with a standard bone density and loaded using the ANSYS Workbench software to calculate the von Mises and Principal (maximum tensile and minimum compressive) stress. Results: The von Mises, compressive, and tensile stresses in the peri-implant bone were lower in the RP model compared to the NP model. Conclusion: RP model yielded a positive result with regard to lowering of peri-implant bone stress levels, in healthy as well as compromised bone qualities when compared to NP designs.
  1,680 2,320 -
CASE REPORTS
Membrane-assisted mineral trioxide aggregate apical plug for management of traumatized immature anterior teeth: Clinical case reports
Raji Viola Solomon, Parupalli karunakar, Sevvana Sree Soumya, Puppala Siddhartha
January-June 2014, 6(1):14-20
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.140198  
Apexification using calcium hydroxide has many disadvantages, such as, it needs more time for the treatment, chance for fracture of the tooth, and incomplete calcification of the bridge. There are many alternative treatments introduced, which have gained popularity, such as, forming an apical plug using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), for excellent results. In cases of wide open apices, it is difficult to limit the restoration to the working length, as such situations lead to the apical extrusion of the material into the periapical region, which prevents further healing. Such conditions can be best treated with the use of a resorbable collagen membrane, which limits the restoration till the working length and prevents the extrusion of the material beyond the apex. The present case reports highlight the non-surgical management of immature teeth by using a membrane as a barrier, with an MTA apical plug, followed by crown rehabilitation.
  3,363 428 2
Van der Woude syndrome with unusual developmental disorders
Vijay Kumar Ambaldhage, Jaishankar Homberhalli Puttabuddi
January-June 2014, 6(1):26-29
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.140206  
Van der Woude syndrome is a rare developmental disorder characterized by a combination of congenital lower lip pits, cleft palate alone or with cleft lip in some cases, and hypodontia. It occurs in approximately 2% of the population with facial clefts. Its prevalence varies from one in 100,000 to 200,000 births. This case report details a unique case of Vander Woude syndrome in a seven-year-old girl and her mother, with median lip pits, cleft lip and cleft palate, missing lateral incisors, and retained deciduous teeth, along with transposition of teeth.
  3,131 543 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Chemical vs. herbal formulations as pre-procedural mouth rinses to combat aerosol production: A randomized controlled study
Koduganti Rekha Rani, Manasa Ambati, Jammula Surya Prasanna, Indumathy Pinnamaneni, Panthula Veerendranath Reddy, Dasari Rajashree
January-June 2014, 6(1):9-13
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.140194  
Background: Disease transmission and barrier techniques are the key concerns during ultrasonic instrumentation as this procedure has the hazard of aerosol production which has a multitude of deleterious effects on the body. The aerosol produced can affect both the patient and the clinician. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of pre-procedural rinsing before scaling by ultrasonic instrumentation and to compare the efficacy of commercially available herbal mouth rinse and a Chlorhexidine gluconate mouth rinse with a control group. The study was conducted from 1 st February to 15 th April 2012 in a tertiary referral care hospital. The study was approved by the institutional ethical committee. This was a randomized single blinded interventional study, where in 36 patients equally divided into three groups participated. Material and Methods: Thirty six patients were recruited in this study aged between 18-35 years. All patients had plaque index scores between1.5-3.0, and were categorized into three groups. Patients with systemic diseases and on antibiotic therapy were excluded. Group A or control group underwent scaling with water as pre-procedural rinse, Group B used 20 ml of 0.2% Chlorhexidine and group C were administered 18 ml of a herbal pre-procedural rinse. Aerosol splatter produced during the procedure were collected on blood agar plates and sent for microbiologic analysis for the assessment of bacterial Colony Forming Units (CFUs). The mean CFUs and standard deviation (SD) for each group were measured. Post hoc test was used to compare the differences between three groups, Control (A) Chlorhexidine (B) and Herbal (C). Results: The mean Colony Forming Units (CFUs) for control group was 114.50, Chlorhexidine group was 56.75 and herbal rinse group was 47.38. Conclusion: Pre-procedural rinsing was found to be effective in reducing aerosol contamination during ultrasonic scaling though no statistically significant difference was found between the two test groups Chlorhexidine and Herbal mouth rinse.
  3,018 497 -
REVIEW ARTICLES
Biomimetic dentistry
Suchetana Goswami
January-June 2018, 10(1):28-32
DOI:10.4103/jorr.jorr_3_17  
“Biomimetics” is the field of science that uses the natural system of synthesizing materials through biomimicry. This method can be widely used in dentistry for regeneration of dental structures and replacement of lost dental tissues. This is a review paper that states its scope, history, different fields of biomimetic dentistry, and its future conditions in India.
  2,855 560 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Analysis of marginal seal of ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus biodentine, and glass ionomer cement as root-end filling materials: An in vitro study
Sakshi Malhotra, Mithra N Hegde
July-December 2015, 7(2):44-49
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.172493  
Background: Search for a root-end filling material fulfilling all the ideal characteristics is an ongoing process. The present study aimed to evaluate the marginal seal of the following materials when used as root-end filling materials, MTA Angelus, White ProRoot MTA, Biodentine and Glass ionomer cement (GIC). Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted maxillary central incisors were included in the study. The crowns were resected followed by cleaning and shaping with hand files and protaper rotary files followed by obturation of the roots. The root ends were resected at 3 mm level. Then, root-end cavity preparation of 3 mm depth was done using ultrasonic tips. The samples were randomly divided into four groups of 15 each and cavities restored with, such as (1) Group 1: MTA Angelus, (2) Group 2: ProRoot MTA, (3) Group 3: Biodentine, and (4) Group 4: GIC. The root samples were coated with two coats of nail varnish and immersed in methylene blue dye 2% for 48 h. Longitudinal root resection was done. The depth of dye penetration was evaluated under the stereomicroscope to examine the extent of microleakage. The amount of dye penetration was measured in millimeters. The results were then statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey's test. Conclusion: Microleakage was present in all the samples. Least amount of apical dye microleakage was seen in biodentine with mean value of 0.16 mm followed by ProRoot MTA 0.68 mm, MTA Angelus 0.74 mm, and GIC 1.53 mm. The best sealing ability was seen in biodentine, and this difference was statistically significant.
  2,583 784 2
Oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior of medical, pharmacy and nursing students at the University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Braimoh Omoigberai Bashiru, Owoturo Enere Omotola
July-December 2016, 8(2):66-71
DOI:10.4103/2249-4987.192209  
Objective: The objective of the study was to assess and compare the oral health knowledge, attitude, and behavior of medical, pharmacy, and nursing students at the University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: A total of 189 students including 94 males and 95 females involved in the cross-sectional surveyed. Data were collected using pretested, self-administered, structured questionnaire. The mean percentage scores, standard deviation, and frequency distribution were calculated. The Student's t-test and ANOVA test were used to test the association between variables. The linear regression analysis was used to establish any association of behavior with knowledge and attitude. Results: The total mean percentage scores for knowledge, attitude, and behavior were more than 50% among the students. The mean percentage scores for knowledge, attitude, and behavior were significantly higher for the medical students compared to pharmacy and nursing students. All the scores were significantly higher in females than in males except for the mean score of knowledge. There was no significant association between knowledge, attitude, and behavior with age. Linear regression analysis showed a significant linear relationship between behavior and attitude, but there was no significant linear relation between behavior and knowledge. Conclusion: The present study indicates that although the mean scores for knowledge, attitude, and behavior were more than 50% among the participants, the students' oral health knowledge, attitude, and behavior was inadequate and needs to be improved upon. The study also revealed that attitude is a determinant of oral health behavior among the students.
  2,865 347 -